Wednesday, December 17, 2014

word of the day: tenebrous

The word of the day is tenebrous:

dark; gloomy; obscure.
Latin tenebrōsus (dictionary.com)
 
"Boris Marcelovsky wrestles with the diva's tempestuous tresses for two reasons: he adores the gossip, and her custom furthered his career when he was just an arriviste from the tenebrous wastes of Trajikistan."
 - Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Torn Wings and Faux Pas

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

word of the day: arriviste

The word of the day is arriviste:

a person who has recently acquired unaccustomed status, wealth, or success, especially by dubious means and without earning concomitant esteem.
< French (dictionary.com)
 
"Boris Marcelovsky wrestles with the diva's tempestuous tresses for two reasons: he adores the gossip, and her custom furthered his career when he was just an arriviste from the tenebrous wastes of Trajikistan."
 - Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Torn Wings and Faux Pas

Monday, December 15, 2014

word of the day: cumbrous

The word of the day is cumbrous:

cumbersome (dictionary.com)
 
"He exalts the solidity of cumbrous furniture over the virtues of pillows and ottomans...
 
"He could hardly clamber atop his charger with that clanking, cumbrous, rusted armor impeding his every jerk, stretch, and twitch."
 - Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Torn Wings and Faux Pas

Sunday, December 14, 2014

word of the day: boggle

The word of the day is boggle:

verb (used with object), boggled, boggling.
1. to overwhelm or bewilder, as with the magnitude, complexity, or abnormality of
2. to bungle; botch. (dictionary.com)
 
"While but a little wraith of a sorceress, she learned from a hoary old alchemist many spells and curses she was to boggle later in life."
 - Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Torn Wings and Faux Pas

Saturday, December 13, 2014

word of the day: Congrevous

The word of the day is Congrevous

William Congreve, 1670–1729, English dramatist (dictionary.com)
"Natty Ampersand wrote of having decapitated several lovers for miffing her upon her return to the female sex with the greeting: 'I've missed not seeing you.'  As Natty pointed out, with poised, scimitar, what they were really saying was they missed her absence or invisibility and could hardly wait for her to disappear again, and she'd only just arrived!  What should they have said, had they valued their lives - or their heads?  Either 'I've missed you' or 'I've missed seeing you,' the latter really a rather lame declaration of fact: you've been invisible to me, or I have not seen you.  Startling Glower encountered the same quasi-double negative from several critics and fans of his theatrical career upon his opening with a new play.  He'd greet these statements with Congrevous ripostes such as 'And I've not missed not avoiding your betises.'"
 - Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Torn Wings and Faux Pas

Friday, December 12, 2014

word of the day: inhere

The word of the day is inhere:
to exist permanently and inseparably in, as a quality, attribute, or element; belong intrinsically; be inherent 
< Latin inhaerēre, equivalent to in- in-2+ haerēre to stick (dictionary.com)
"Consist in means to lie in or inhere in, to have as a defining attribute."
 - Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Torn Wings and Faux Pas

Thursday, December 11, 2014

word of the day: mousseline

The word of the day is moussline:
"At the death of the royal consort, musical consorts throughout the land played dirges, and the city of Amplochacha was draped in mourning - even the horses drawing state coaches wore black bands on their forequarters - while twenty supplementary scribes were taken on to handle the letters of condolence addressed to King Alabastro, who could not be talked out of the mousseline pajamas he'd been wearing when his beloved queen, Dariushka, died of fright in her sleep."
 - Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Torn Wings and Faux Pas